Monthly Archives: September 2013

Social Media Do’s and Don’ts: Chapter 5

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Chapter 5 of our text discuses the appropriate behaviors in which employees should conduct themselves over social media on behalf of their companies. Social  Media guidelines are necessary to ensure that employees are showcasing the values of the company in a positive and effective way.   Gemma Griffiths (2012), discusses tips to incorporate when developing social media guidelines. The most important of these tips I believe are, ” set expectations of employees, remind employees to remain professional, provide training, and outline repercussions of violation” (p. 42-43).  While employee trust is important it is crucial that employees stay professional and work within the guidelines set by their company.

An example of an employee mishap which can deface the reputation of a company is when social media specialist Gloria Huang posted on the American Red Cross’ twitter page about how she was drinking beer and ‘getting slizzard’. It was a critical mistake that she blamed on her “inability to use Hootsuite and meant her ill-fated tweet for her private account”.

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This example is one of the many reasons why it is so critical that employees act professionally and ” (…)  why it is essential to differentiate a personal social media account from a professional one (Griffiths, 2012, p. 39).” Although it may be perceived as strict for companies to create guidelines it is essential for employees to have some sort of framework to work off of. Communications policies are the best way to ensure that your employees have the correct understanding of how to conduct themselves through social media. The key point that I took away from this chapter is DO: THINK BEFORE YOU POST. If there is any question in your mind as to whether or not your post is appropriate or professional then it most likely is not. 

 

Information obtained from:

Howell, K. “An Introduction to Social Networks.” Share This: The Social Media Handbook for PR Professionals. Chichester: John Wiley & Sons, 2012. p.39, 42-43 . Print.

http://blog.marketo.com/blog/2013/07/epically-awful-social-media-blunders-and-why-your-business-should-care.html

 

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#H@CKED

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Just this past week my Twitter account was comprised for the third time. As much as I love Twitter this got me questioning just how safe the information on this site is. What concerns me is that this is happening on a daily basis. In our text Sanders states while speaking about social media that “in time it will impact every part of an organisation– yet in some businesses social media are not so much seen as a wonderful opportunity but as a worrying threat, and in others just an irrelevant distraction” (p. 15, 2012).  This got me thinking is this worrying threat relevant to the companies and users of Twitter? 

This past year companies like Burger King and Jeep have fell victim to Twitters site hacking problem. Burger Kings tweet scandal occurred when a virus took over stating that rival McDonald’s had bought out their company. Another similar, example was a tweet from Jeep stating that rival company Cadillac purchased Jeep. Image

The problem is that these companies are not the first to be hacked nor will they be the last! After further research I learned that Twitters own account was hacked, “with attackers gaining access to usernames as well as encrypted and randomized passwords for about 250,000 users”.  Despite, these issues I doubt that myself or any major companies with completely abandon Twitter. Twitter is an amazing platform in which to socialize and advertise. It is my go to place for the latest news or gossip. 

Although my faith in Twitter has not swayed I am taking precautionary steps to ensure that this will not happen again. I hope that Twitter is taking actions to prevent continuing security lapses. 

Information obtained from:

http://money.cnn.com/2013/02/21/technology/social/twitter-hacking/index.html

Howell, K. “An Introduction to Social Networks.” Share This: The Social Media Handbook for PR Professionals. Chichester: John Wiley & Sons, 2012. p. 5. Print.

 

Vine v. Instagram

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It amazes me how rapidly social networking sites are expanding. While these networks create a  massive platform for creativity and self-expression they allow people to connect and share with family, friends and peers. More recently I have noticed the  amount of content sharing that occurs on social networks. As  Howell states, ” With the profusion of social networks and subsequent conversation has come s deluge of content. From videos and pictures to links and music it seems content can be found anywhere” ( p. 10, 2012).  This user-generated content, Howell goes on to explain, is frequently found and stored on social networks.

Relatively new updates have been established through social networks such as Vine and Instagram that allows its users to upload and post their  videos and pictures from these networks onto other social networks such as Facebook and Twitter.

Tweeting Vine videos on Twitter

This is something I commonly use  because of its ability to overlap social networks.  Considering Vine is owned by Twitter it only makes sense that the two social networks combine allowing you to Tweet, tag and comment your Vine videos onto Twitter. Vine recently tweeted on August 20, 2013, ” We’ve said this before and we’ll say it again: this community – now more than 40 million of you – is amazing. Thank you for inspiring us”. With the enthusiasm around Vines ability to share video Instagram has also jumped on board. Instagram is owned by Facebook a competitor of Twitter. Currently despite Vines 13 million monthly users Instagram is crushing  the competition with 130 million monthly users. Currently, both Vine and Instagram allow you to share video content on Facebook and Twitter. However, Instagram seems to be steps of ahead of Vine allowing for longer video time with 15 seconds compared to Vines 6 second. Instagram also allows which thumbnail view can be seen on your newsfeed a feature that is not offered by Vine. This may seem simplistic but this feature is just another awesome way you can personalize the content you share. It seems that the public is responding to Instagrams ability to share not only photo but video content proving that the more user-generated content a social network allows the better! It will be interesting to see how Instagrams and Vines competitiveness continues to develop and how it enhances each applications abilities.  

Information from:

Howell, K. “An Introduction to Social Networks.” Share This: The Social Media Handbook for PR Professionals. Chichester: John Wiley & Sons, 2012. p. 5. Print.

http://www.itproportal.com/2013/08/22/twitters-video-sharing-vine-app-smashes-40-million-user-milestone/

http://www.searchenginejournal.com/instagram-video-vs-vine-video-which-is-better-for-your-brand/65850/